by Infogr.am

Vintage Infodesign [40]

Old charts, maps and graphics to feast your eyes upon

October 7, 2013

This post is brought to you by Infographic World.

 

For this week’s Vintage InfoDesign, we have to mention, once more, Wired’s Map Lab blog – one of our favorite places about cartography, including old maps and charts. This time, Greg Miller visited one of the largest map collections in the world, at the New York Public Library.

The article is filled with interesting comments about a dozen maps by Matt Knutzen, the geospatial librarian overseeing 433,000 sheet maps and 20,000 atlases and books on cartography. Here are some of the maps mentioned in that post, alongside our usual round-up of visualizations made before 1960.

The Sanitary and Social Chart (1864) | E.R. Pulling

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic The Sanitary and Social Chart (1864)
(image: E.R. Pulling)

(Via)

New York City (1853) | Matthew Dripps

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic New York City (1853)
(image: Matthew Dripps)

(Via)

Nieu Nederland (1675) | Arent Roggeveen

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Nieu Nederland (1675)
(image: Arent Roggeveen)

(Via)

Cuba and Jamaica (1706) | Pieter Vander Aa

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Cuba and Jamaica (1706)
(image: Pieter Vander Aa)

(Via)

Docks, Seaport Facilities of Harbours (1895) | Bibliographisches Institut Leipzig

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Docks, Seaport Facilities of Harbours  (1895)
(image: Bibliographisches Institut Leipzig)

(Via)

Gulzar Calligraphic Panel (c1797) | Husayn Zarrin Qalam

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Gulzar Calligraphic Panel (c1797)
(image: Husayn Zarrin Qalam)

(Via)

Survey of North Carolina (1770) | John Collet

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic  Survey of North Carolina (1770)
(image: John Collet)

(Via)

Idiots (1870) | Frederick Howard Wines

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Idiots (1870)
(image: Frederick Howard Wines)

(Via)

The lights which must not make a mistake (1954) | Max Parrish

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic The lights which must not make a mistake (1954)
(image: Max Parrish)

(Via)

Pinocchio the Puppet (1940) | Popular Science

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Pinocchio the Puppet  (1940)
(image: Popular Science)

(Via)

Map of Telegraphy, Europe and North America (1858) | Charles Magnus

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic  Map of Telegraphy, Europe and North America (1858)
(image: Charles Magnus)

(Via)

Astrological Map (1677) | Shibukawa Harumi

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Astrological Map (1677)
(image: Shibukawa Harumi)

(Via)

Patent for improved Michaux-Perreaux steam velocipede (1872) | James Titus Allen

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Patent for improved Michaux-Perreaux steam velocipede (1872)
(image: James Titus Allen)

(Viac)

The Sun and Solar Phenomena (1860) | John Emslie

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic The Sun and Solar Phenomena (1860)
(image: John Emslie)

(Via)

Pumping music through the house (1941) | Fortune magazine

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Pumping music through the house (1941)
(image: Fortune magazine)

(Via)

Plate 2: Cetus, Aquarius, Andromeda. (1693) | Ignace Gaston Pardies

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic Plate 2:  Cetus, Aquarius, Andromeda. (1693)
(image: Ignace Gaston Pardies)

(Via)

German Provincies (c1700) | Peter Schenk

Partial screen capture of the interactive infographic German Provincies (c1700)
(image: Peter Schenk)

(Via)

 

We’ll be back next week with another round-up of vintage maps, graphics and diagrams. Meanwhile, you might want to visit our Pinterest board, where we’re posting all of these examples.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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