by Infogr.am

Vintage Infodesign [69]

Our weekly journey into data visualization history

May 12, 2014

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Back in 2006, the National Library of Medicine acquired a large collection of Chinese Public Health materials, about seven thousand items produced from early 20th century to the year of SARS. These materials present rich visual representations of public health concerns which were closely tied to the political, social, economic, and even military engagements of China during different time periods.

The collection has a wide range of media presentations, like posters, health newsletters, health newspapers and paintings, and the folks at Retronaut featured it recently.

The series of posters titled Understanding Human Body was produced in 1933, and we’ll open today’s Vintage InfoDesign with a few of them:

Understanding the human body Public Health Posters (1933)

(image: Understanding the human body Public Health Posters (1933))
(image: Understanding the human body Public Health Posters (1933))
(image: Understanding the human body Public Health Posters (1933))
(image: Understanding the human body Public Health Posters (1933))

(Via)

New Guinea (1593) | Cornelis De Jode

(image: Cornelis De Jode)

(Via)

The Magic Worlds of Walt Disney (1963) | National Geographic

(image: National Geographic)

(Via)

Space station (1949) | Ari Shternfeld

(image: Ari Shternfeld)

(Via)

The Bristol Brabazon (c1950) | Kenneth M Sibley

(image: Kenneth M Sibley)

(Via)

The “Gibson” Harp-guitar, Style “U” (1910) | Gibson

(image: Gibson)

(Via)

How three color movies are made (1935) | Modern Mechanix

(image: Modern Mechanix)

(Via)

Rank of the most populous cities (1898) | Henry Gannett

(image: Henry Gannett)

(Via)

A New Map of the most Considerable Plantations of the English In America (1700) | Edward Wells

(image: Edward Wells)

(Via)

Map of Huozhou Office (1558)

(image: Map of Huozhou Office (1558))

(Via)

Reaches of New York City (1939) | National Geographic

(image: National Geographic)

(Via)

Map of the Kingdom of Hungary (c1527) | Lázár deák

(image: Lázár deák)

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s Vintage InfoDesign! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, where we’re posting all of these visual goodies.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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