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Vintage Infodesign [84]

Visual inspiration from classic data visualization and cartography gems

August 25, 2014

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All set for another week of work, and as we do every Monday, here’s our regular ‘fix’ of visual inspiration from before 1960. And when you think about the recent explosion on the Internet of the whole infographic thing, it’s somewhat comforting to see that so many good examples from the past are still available – thanks to the magnificent job done by Public Libraries, Universities, Private collectors and others, digitizing and sharing all this content.

The first picks of today’s Vintage InfoDesign comes from one of our longtime favorite places to browse old maps, graphics and diagrams: Flickr. In this particular case, an album on Donald W. Hamer Maps Library (Penn State University)’ Flickr profile

The album in question is titled OSS WWII maps, currently serving more than 150 maps made by the United States Office of Strategic Services (OSS) – the predecessor of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). This intelligence agency was created during World War II, in order to coordinate espionage activities behind enemy lines for the branches of the United States Armed Forces. Other functions of the OSS included the use of propaganda, subversion, and post-war planning, for which the use of maps such as the ones below were essential.

Enjoy this week’s picks:

Germany: Textile and Apparel Industries (1944) | U.S. Office of Strategic Services

(image: U.S. Office of Strategic Services)

(Via)

Soils of Central Europe (1943) | U.S. Office of Strategic Services

(image: U.S. Office of Strategic Services)

(Via)

German railroads: Destination of freight traffic by traffic districts (1942) | U.S. Office of Strategic Services

(image: U.S. Office of Strategic Services)

(Via)

OSS Theater Map (1944) | U.S. Office of Strategic Services

(image: U.S. Office of Strategic Services)

(Via)

The Delaware Blowing Up New York City (1909) | The New York Tribune

(image: The New York Tribune)

(Via)

The “Massive Retaliatory Power” (1954) | Fortune Magazine

(image: Fortune Magazine)

(Via)

Where can we dock this marine monster when she reaches the port of New York? (1910) | The New York Tribune

(image: The New York Tribune)

(Via)

Wrinkles Wrinkles Wrinkles (1899) | The San Francisco Call

(image: The San Francisco Call)

(Via)

Yosemite national park relief map (1914) | Department of the Interior

(image: Department of the Interior)

(Via)

Steam hammer patent (1854) | James Nasmyth

(image: James Nasmyth)

(Via)

Franciscan missions around the world (1927)

(image: Franciscan missions around the world (1927))

(Via)

Fletcher-class destroyer technical drawing (1954) | U.S. Navy

(image: U.S. Navy)

(Via)

A crane and railway maps of Japan (c1920) | The Transportation Division of the Railway Bureau

(image: The Transportation Division of the Railway Bureau)

(Via)

Map of the Landscapes of Cuba (1939) | Gerardo Canet and Erwin Raisz

(image: Gerardo Canet & Erwin Raisz)

(Via)

Titan missile bunker (1960) | Fortune magazine

(image: Fortune magazine)

(Via)

Firing attitudes of Parisian duelists (1909) | The New York Tribune

(image: The New York Tribune)

(Via)

Map of Philadelphia (1847) | Samuel Augustus Mitchell

(image: Samuel Augustus Mitchell)

(Via)

Map of Provence (1747) | Daniel de la Feuille

(image: Daniel de la Feuille)

(Via)

Where the River Congo flows (1952) | Fortune magazine

(image: Fortune Magazine)

(Via)

Aircraft Carrier Steam Catapult (1953) | Popular Mechanics

(image: Popular Mechanics)

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s round up! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, just with old maps and infographics.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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