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Vintage Infodesign [93]

Our weekly dive into the history of information design

October 27, 2014

Last week, we opened this weekly round up of vintage charts, maps and diagrams with Anna Heermans’ 1875 pictorial atlas A Hieroglyphic Geography of the United States, that came to our attention thanks to Slate’s history blog. So we thought it would be fun to look out for more examples of rebuses published before our modern days – the earliest examples go back to as early as the 16th century.

Wikipedia was the obvious first stop, and we have a couple of the examples that are included in the article about rebuses over there – including one in map form for the names of Japanese provinces, from around 1800 . We also found some 19th century Italian examples in the Pines of Rome blog (courtesy of the Press Office of the Ministero per i Beni Culturali), and there are probably many more out there. Let us know if you find more early examples of the use of rebus, and we’ll be sure to feature it here in this space, when we return to the topic.

As for the rest of our picks, we hope you enjoy them as much as we did while preparing this post:

Kuni rebus (c1800)

(image: Kuni rebus (c1800))

(Via)

Italian Rebus (c1800)

(image: Italian Rebus (c1800))
(image: Italian Rebus (c1800))

(Via)

German Rebus (c1620)

(image: German Rebus (c1620))

(Via)

Range of artillery (1941) | Fortune Magazine

(image: Fortune Magazine)

(Via)

Map of the square and stationary Earth (1893) | Orlando Ferguson

(image: Orlando Ferguson)

(Via)

Airship Skyport (1939) | Popular Science

(image: Popular Science)

(Via)

World Fair Tour map (1939) | The New Yorker

(image: The New Yorker)

(Via)

A map of the Chesapeake Bay (1959) | Edwin Tunis

(image: Edwin Tunis)

(Via)

Tank Tactics: Nine primer lessons (1942) | Fortune Magazine

(image: Fortune Magazine)
(image: Fortune Magazine)

(Via)

The city of Tenochtitlán (1524)

(image: The city of Tenochtitlán (1524))

(Via)

Arctic Regions Map (1925) | National Geographic

(image: National Geographic)

(Via)

Chemical composition of living things (1957) | Lord Boyd-Orr

(image: Lord Boyd-Orr)

(Via)

Carmel-by-the-Sea: Past and present (1942) | Jo Mora

(image: Jo Mora)

(Via)

America Septentrionalis Concinnata juxta Observationes (1760) | Tobias Conrad Lotter

(image: Tobias Conrad Lotter)

(Via)

Map of Exeter (1744) | John Rocque

(image: John Rocque)

(Via)

Atomic Airplane (1951) | Popular Science

(image: Popular Science)

(Via)

Canada and Newfoundland: Their natural and industrial resources (1942) | Leslie MacDonald-Gill

(image: Leslie MacDonald-Gill)

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s round up! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, just with old maps and infographics.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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