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Vintage Infodesign [116]

Inspiration from the early days of information design

May 4, 2015

Back in December, we pulled together a list of gifts that would impress any data viz geek, just in time for Christmas. Among the most common ones, you have, naturally, posters and prints to decorate your home or work place, ranging from the contemporary work by Pop Charts Lab, to the beautiful old prints of History Shots.

But there’s always room for more, so we’d like to open this edition of Vintage InfoDesign with a couple of examples collected from Vintage Visualizations, a project of the Brooklyn Brainery in which they reproduced a number of the Library of Congress‘ Civil War-era data visualizations in high-quality poster prints, and made them available for purchase.

Hope you enjoy, and have a great week!

Live Stock and Products (1880) | Statistical Atlas of the United States

(image: Statistical Atlas of the United States)

(Via)

Church accommodations (1870) | Statistical Atlas of the United States

(image: Statistical Atlas of the United States)

(Via)

Rank of states and territories in population at each census: 1790 – 1890 (1890) | Statistical Atlas of the United States

(image: Statistical Atlas of the United States)

(Via)

Visible heavens from April 18th to July 21st (1855) | Smith’s Illustrated astronomy

(image: Everett Henry)

(Via)

Map of Marseille (1575) | Georg Braun, Franz Hogenberg

(image: Georg Braun, Franz Hogenberg)

(Via)

Long range aid to navigation (1945) | Fortune magazine

(image: Fortune magazine)

(Via)

The Voyage of the Pequod (1956) | Everett Henry

(image: Everett Henry)

(Via)

Insularum Aliquot Maris Mediterranei Descriptio (1608) | Abraham Ortelius

(image: Abraham Ortelius)

(Via)

Geological Map of Europe (1875) | Andre Dumont

(image: Andre Dumont)

(Via)

Our Round Earth in Space (1935) | London Geographical Institute

(image: London Geographical Institute)

(Via)

Old vs. New Locomotive (1920) | Popular Science Monthly

(image: Popular Science Monthly)

(Via)

4th Armored Division, U.S. Third Army (1945) | Christopher Williams

(image: Christopher Williams)

(Via)

Map of the Three Arabias (1654) | Nicolas Sanson d’Abbeville

(image: Nicolas Sanson d’Abbeville)

(Via)

Yank’s New Guinea (1944) | Charles Pearson

(image: Charles Pearson)

(Via)

You’d better add 50% (1946) | Fortune magazine

(image: Fortune magazine)

(Via)

The victors of the Battle of the River Plate (1939)

(image: The victors of the Battle of the River Plate (1939))

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s round up! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, just with old maps and infographics.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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