by Infogram
Create infographics

Vintage Infodesign [118]

From vintage cutaway ads to medieval maps, a visual feast to kick off the week

May 18, 2015

It’s been a while since we’ve recommended a blog here in this space, and we just came across recently with Phil Beard’s Notes on the arts and visual culture, which features images like vintage postcards, photos, old print adds, and a bunch of other cool stuff.

This is far from being a new blog, since it’s been up since 2007, so there’s a huge archive to explore. We’ve picked one of Phil’s most recent article to open today’s post, in which he collected several examples of advertising cutaways from the pages of mid-century magazines. As he explains, “these cutaway drawings were valuable advertising tools in an age where dazzling the consumer with engineering complexity was an effective strategy.”

Have a great week!

General Motors at the World’s Fair (1933) | The Saturday Evening Post

(image: The Saturday Evening Post)

(Via)

Let’s take a look at the Inner Ford (1956) | Ford

(image: Ford)

(Via)

Inside a car (c1950) | Eaton Manufacturing Company

(image: Eaton Manufacturing Company)

(Via)

Pepperell in every american home (c1950) | Pepperell Fabrics

(image: Pepperell Fabrics)

(Via)

Look to Your Sales Mileage (c1930) | The Mutual Broadcasting System

(image: The Mutual Broadcasting System)

(Via)

Carte Du Gouvernement Ecclesiastique D’Angleterre (1719) | Henri Chatelain

(image: Henri Chatelain)

(Via)

Popular vote (1883) | Statistical Atlas of the United States

(image: Statistical Atlas of the United States)

(Via)

Cheltenham (1879) | Geological Survey of Great Britain and Ireland

(image: Geological Survey of Great Britain and Ireland)

(Via)

Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay (1939) | Ruth Taylor White

(image: Ruth Taylor White)

(Via)

Planisphaerium Copernicanum (1708) | Andreas Cellarius

(image: Andreas Cellarius)

(Via)

Movements of Jupiter and Saturn in relation to the Earth (1854) | Astronomie populaire

(image: Astronomie populaire)

(Via)

The world at one view (1821)

(image: The world at one view (1821))

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s round up! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, just with old maps and infographics.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

Follow: