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Digital Cartography [104]

Storytelling and data journalism with digital maps at the center

July 1, 2015

If you’re a fan of digital maps and cartography, this has been a great week for you, here on Visualoop. For instances, we featured yesterday the collective work of the data journalism/visualization unit at Zeit Online, where interactive maps are a huge part of their visual storytelling kit.

And right after that, Severino Ribecca shared with our audience a bit of the history and examples of use of Choropleth Maps, in his latest contribution to the special series about the most important types of charts.

Now, its time for the weekly round up with the interactive maps that came to our attention, starting with our top highlights:

Gay marriage chronology | The Los Angeles Times

No surprises, as far as the topic in hand in the first pick of this week: On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry nationwide. For more than a decade, the battle over same-sex marriage and other rights for gay couples has been hard fought in U.S. courts and legislatures and at the ballot box. The map below, from the The Los Angeles Times is just one of the many created around this historic day.

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Gay marriage chronology
(image: The Los Angeles Times)

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database | Slate

This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. By the conclusion of the trans-Atlantic slave trade at the end of the 19th century, Europeans had enslaved and transported more than 12.5 million Africans. And historians estimate that at least 2 million didn’t survive the journey. Seen on Nathan Yau’s Flowing Data.

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database
(image: Slate)

Where the population of Europe is growing – and where it’s declining | Berliner Morgenpost

Where is the population of Europe actually growing and where is it declining? This map provides a picture of unprecedented detail, showing population growth in 119,406 municipalities from 43 European countries (including Turkey). The application uses data from the German Federal Institute for Research on Building, Urban Affairs and Spatial Development (BBSR) which published its analysis in June 2015 together with a static map that went viral. Also, check out our special profile with the work being done by the Berliner Morgenpost’s data visualization team.

Here are all the other picks of the week:

Pride of Place | Historic England and Leeds Beckett University

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Pride of Place
(image: Historic England and Leeds Beckett University)

(Via Maps Mania)

How Texas counties are handling same-sex marriage licenses | The Dallas Morning News

Partial screen capture of the interactive map How Texas counties are handling same-sex marriage licenses
(image: The Dallas Morning News)

AirBNB vs Berlin | Alsino Skowronnek, Lucas Vogel, Jonas Parnow

Partial screen capture of the interactive map AirBNB vs Berlin
(image: Alsino Skowronnek, Lucas Vogel, Jonas Parnow)

Love Wins | MapBox

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Love Wins
(image: MapBox)

Global Terrorism Casualties | David Johnson

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Global Terrorism Casualties
(image: UK Cabinet Office)

(Via Maps Mania)

Greater Manchester Open Data Infrastructure Map | Cabinet Office

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Greater Manchester Open Data Infrastructure Map

Long distance trains in Spain | Microsiervos

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Long distance trains in Spain
(image: Microsiervos)

(Via Maps Mania)

Prison system in Brazil | G1

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Prison system in Brazil
(image: G1)

Investments in infrastructure | Folha de S. Paulo

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Investments in infrastructure
(image: Folha de S. Paulo)

The last remaining monuments of the Confederacy | Fusion

Partial screen capture of the interactive map The last remaining monuments of the Confederacy
(image: Fusion)

Socio-Economic Tectonics | Kenneth Field

Partial screen capture of the interactive map Socio-Economic Tectonics
(image: Kenneth Field)

(Via Maps Mania)

 

That’s it for today’s Digital Cartography, but feel free to browse through hundreds of interactive maps on Pinterest. And we’ll be back next week!

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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