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Vintage Infodesign [108]

Revisiting the ancient arts of information visualization and cartography

February 23, 2015

While we’ve been featuring on a regular basis infographics and visualizations about the recent outbreak of measles in the United States, our opening picks for today’s Vintage InfoDesign shows how late-19th-century doctors already knew that it was easily transmissible. Another great find from Slate’s Rebecca Onion, from the wonderful archives of the David Rumsey Map Collection.

From the article: “These maps of measles mortality appeared in three late-19th-century statistical atlases published by the Census Office. Experiments in data visualization, the atlases are modern in their scope and ambition. Since they were compiled in a time before the availability of vaccines for most childhood diseases (with smallpox being the exception), they are a good record of the former pervasiveness of measles.”

Here are the visualizations and maps we picked for you today::

Ratio of deaths from measles (1883) | United States Census Office

(image: United States Census Office)

(Via)

Number of deaths from measles (1898) | United States Census Office

(image: United States Census Office)

(Via)

Death rates from measles (1903) | United States Census Office

(image: United States Census Office)

(Via)

Tea revives the world (1940) | MacDonald Gill

(image: MacDonald Gill)

(Via)

Pannoniae, et Illyrici veteris tabvla (1590) | Abraham Ortelius

(image: Abraham Ortelius)

(Via)

Los Angeles as it appeared in 1871 (1929) | Women’s University Club of Los Angeles

(image: Women’s University Club of Los Angeles)

(Via)

Ranch House Cutaway Drawing (1956) | Popular Mechanics

(image: Popular Mechanics)

(Via)

US World Communications (1944) | Fortune magazine

(image: Fortune magazine)

(Via)

Orbis Terrarum Nova et Accuratissima Tabula (1658) | Nicholas Visscher

(image: Nicholas Visscher)

(Via)

Chateau de Belleroy Boudan (1715) | Louis Boudan

(image: Louis Boudan)

(Via)

More farms for public power lines (1935) | Business Week

(image: Business Week)

(Via)

Cosmographical Map or Universal Description of the World with the Actual Path of the Winds (1570) | Jean Cossin

(image: Jean Cossin)

(Via)

Canada’s Postwar Air Policy (1943) | Fortune Magazine

(image: Fortune Magazine)

(Via)

Chart Of Geographical Illustrations (1915) | F. Rutley

(image: F. Rutley)

(Via)

Representation of Hispalis, Generally Known as Seville (1617) | Johannes Janssonius

(image: Johannes Janssonius)

(Via)

Who owns the Federal debt (1937) | Business Week

(image: Business Week)

(Via)

 

That’s it for today’s round up! We’ll be back next week with another selection, but until then, enjoy our Pinterest board, just with old maps and infographics.

Written by Tiago Veloso

Tiago Veloso is the founder and editor of Visualoop and Visualoop Brasil . He is Portuguese, currently based in Bonito, Brazil.

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